Posted in Modelling and Sculpting, Modular Sets, Practical Work, Technical Work

Designing interior Modular sets – Maya

Last year I found a really cool link to a presentation Joel Burgess (Linked below), an artist at Bethesda who develops modular sets, or as he calls them, ‘kits’. He explains that using kits ‘mitigates scope’, and by that he means the amount of art created is much lower when using modular sets because kits can be re-used and re-purposed.

You attach the pieces to a grid and use snaps to attach them perfectly on each other, which is exactly what I plan to do with my interior level. First of all, a plan is needed for which assets to create. I drew myself a quick sketch in Photoshop to help me visualise what I would need.

kit1.jpg

Crude but effective.

I began taking this basic set and creating them in Maya, to try and get the proportions right. I set the grid to Unreal proportions, snapped the grid to 10 so each kit piece would perfectly connect, and began.

kit2.jpg

I did all to begin with apart from the elevator doors because I didn’t think they were particularly vital. I UV’d in a complicated way;

mm

The large top box was tiling with itself along the horizontal, but not vertical as I needed room for the bottom details. They also tiled, and I made sure not to overlap so lighting and textures would not clash.

I had the basic set done but I wasn’t 100% sure of what style to create it, when inspiration hit from an unlikely source. I was watching It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and the episode involved the characters on a cruise ship, trying to steal back their beer from the guts of the ship. I saw the walls and corridor and thought ‘this would work well for what I need. I screenshotted the show and used it for the design and texture inspiration!

inter1inter2

These images helped to create the details, so I created pipes (Which would transfer the air through the rooms, linking to the vents seen outside), and wall brackets to show the thick metal the walls are made of.

ineri1.jpg

 

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